The Sublime in Cambodia and Indonesia

    Wednesday August 14, 2013 @ 7:00 PM
    Price: $15.00
    Member Price: $13.50


    This event has been postponed.

    If you are currently a ticket holder for this program please contact the Box Office before August 14, 2013 at (212) 620-5000 ext. 344 any day of the week from 11:00am-5:00pm, so we may process a refund for you. We do not keep credit card details on file and we will need to speak to you to process a refund to your credit card. You may also stop in at the museum front desk to receive your full refund.

    In this illustrated talk Helen Jessup compares the sculpture and architecture of Cambodia (as in Angkor) and Indonesia (as in Borobudur).  While in both civilizations the representation of deities drew on Indian precepts and symbolism, sculpture evolved in a stylistically distinct manner so that an Indian Shiva would never be mistaken for a Khmer or Javanese Shiva. Temple architecture also, while embodying many Indian spatial concepts, developed into distinctly national form.

    This richly illustrated keytalk is part of Exporting Enlightenment, a ten-part series over the summer that traces the spread of Buddhism and Hinduism along these cultural and trade trajectories. For the full series that accompanies the exhibition From India East see www.rmanyc.org/exportingenlightenment

     

    About the Speaker

    Helen Jessup is an independent scholar of Southeast Asian art and culture and writes extensively about Indonesia and Cambodia in particular (Court Arts of Indonesia, Temples of Cambodia: The Heart of Angkor, and Art & Architecture of Cambodia). In this talk she compares the sculpture and architecture of Cambodia, such as Angkor, and Indonesia, such as Borobudur, which were both influenced by the religions and artistic traditions of India. While in both civilizations the representation of deities drew on Indian precepts and symbolism, sculpture evolved in a stylistically distinct manner such that an Indian Shiva could never be mistaken for a Khmer or Javanese Shiva. Temple architecture also, while embodying many Indian spatial concepts, developed into a distinctly national form. Jessup will pay particular attention to local specialization that engendered further, fascinating divergences between the Cambodian and Indonesian traditions.

    Image: Head of Shiva Cambodia; first quarter of 10th century, Bakheng or Preah Ko Style Sandstone Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Michael de Havenon, 83.182.5

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